Cottages in Longford Shropshire and Cottages in England AND Shropshire

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Cottage Ref:RD8
  • Grades: 3 Star
  • Sleeps: 10
  • Shropshire England
  • Pet Friendly : Yes
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Prominent location in 18 acres of parkland, walkers can follow the Clive of India trails, or the bloodthirsty ’Murder and Mayhem’ track. . Built in 1695 by Bulkeley Mackworth on the site of a much older house inherited from his grandmother’s family, and set in a prominent location within 18 acres of parkland, the apartment [right in photograph] of this Queen Anne mansion has been restored with character and style. Still lived in by the family who built the house, Buntingsdale is mentioned in Doomsday, and other famous names connected with the manor include Lady Godiva of Coventry, the Cabot brothers and Peter Bulkely, who founded Concord, Mass. USA, because he was disappointed in not inheriting Buntingsdale! An ancient castle is still there in the earthworks below the Hall. An army camped in the hill above the house before the Battle of Shrewsbury. The land was fought over in the Civil Wars, when two Mackworths, father and son, were in turn Governors of Shrewsbury Castle; their portraits hang in the Hall. In the more recent Second World War, the Hall was used as a training ground and wireless listening station, and was only released from service in the 1960s, when it was excused from being the command centre for nuclear strikes in the West Midlands. With views to the Welsh hills over open countryside, the accommodation offered is of a very high standard, with comfort and all modern conveniences. An enormous games room with a full-sized snooker table, table tennis, darts and beer fridge allows for friendly competition in front of a roaring fire. Within the grounds lies a large lake and river frontage with rowing boat and inflatable kayak whilst guests have use of their own secluded courtyard area. There is private coarse fishing available (licence required), with basic equipment provided, and carp and trout with a jetty on the lake. There is also rough shooting (duck, licence required) and private snowdrop, daffodil and bluebell woods in season, with badgers and buzzards. For pets, an outdoor kennel is also available. The private drive is ¾-mile and children’s bikes are welcome. Bike hire is also available by arrangement with the owner. Walks start from the property and the owner also offers wellingtons and warm coats to borrow. Tours of the hall are available by arrangement with the owner, including Victorian icehouse and part tunnels, weather permitting. There is also a large formal Georgian dining room and drawing room with painted ceiling and fireplace for extra hire, and two large open fires in the drawing room and games room. The neighbouring community farm, 3 miles, has plenty of amenities including a restaurant, tea room, shop, organic butchery, walking trails, events and children’s activities. Home of the gingerbread, the attractive town of Market Drayton was once famed for its Damson Fairs, and many Draytonarians continue the tradition with damson feasts each autumn. Keen walkers can follow the trails of the famous Clive of India or the unusual bloodthirsty ‘Murder and Mayhem’ track, whilst a wild animal trail offers a rather more sedate option for the children! Market Drayton is the ideal base for touring Stoke and the Potteries, Ironbridge, Shrewsbury and North Wales. The Shropshire union canal winds it way close to the town, its tow paths, flights of locks and breathtaking aqueduct well worth a visit. Nearby you can find award-winning gardens, such as Hodnet, Wollerton Old Hall and Hawkstone Park, with its golf course and unique landscape of caves, woodland and follies. Horse riding and golf nearby. Shops and pubs 2 miles.. Spiral staircase to first floor: Large living room with open fire. Spacious modern fitted kitchen with dining area. Three double bedrooms, one with en-suite bathroom with shower attachment and toilet, one with en-suite shower room with high pressure shower and toilet, and one with wash basin and toilet. Two twin bedrooms with an interconnecting door (and each with a separate entrance from corridor), each with en-suite bathroom with shower attachments and toilet. . Open fire – fuel included Electricity, full gas central heating, bed linen and towels includedCotTwo high chairsSky TVDVDMicrowaveDishwasherWashing machineTumble dryerFridge/freezerWi-fiSmall courtyard with patio and furnitureShared grounds of 18 acres with fishing by arrangementBarbecueAmple parkingGames room with full-size billiards table and table tennisPets free of charge, to be kept on a lead and under strict control- sheep countryUnsuitable for the infirm (steps to first floor entrance)NB: Lake in grounds
Built in 1695 by Bulkeley Mackworth on the site of a much older house inherited from his grandmother’s family, and set in a prominent location within 18 acres of parkland, the apartment [right in photograph] of this Queen Anne mansion has been restored with character and style. Still lived in by the family who built the house, Buntingsdale is mentioned in Doomsday, and other famous names connected with the manor include Lady Godiva of Coventry, the Cabot brothers and Peter Bulkely, who founded Concord, Mass. USA, because he was disappointed in not inheriting Buntingsdale! An ancient castle is still there in the earthworks below the Hall. An army camped in the hill above the house before the Battle of Shrewsbury. The land was fought over in the Civil Wars, when two Mackworths, father and son, were in turn Governors of Shrewsbury Castle; their portraits hang in the Hall. In the more recent Second World War, the Hall was used as a training ground and wireless listening station, and was only released from service in the 1960s, when it was excused from being the command centre for nuclear strikes in the West Midlands. With views to the Welsh hills over open countryside, the accommodation offered is of a very high standard, with comfort and all modern conveniences. An enormous games room with a full-sized snooker table, table tennis, darts and beer fridge allows for friendly competition in front of a roaring fire. Within the grounds lies a large lake and river frontage with rowing boat and inflatable kayak whilst guests have use of their own secluded courtyard area. There is private coarse fishing available (licence required), with basic equipment provided, and carp and trout with a jetty on the lake. There is also rough shooting (duck, licence required) and private snowdrop, daffodil and bluebell woods in season, with badgers and buzzards. For pets, an outdoor kennel is also available. The private drive is ¾-mile and children’s bikes are welcome. Bike hire is also available by arrangement with the owner. Walks start from the property and the owner also offers wellingtons and warm coats to borrow. Tours of the hall are available by arrangement with the owner, including Victorian icehouse and part tunnels, weather permitting. There is also a large formal Georgian dining room and drawing room with painted ceiling and fireplace for extra hire, and two large open fires in the drawing room and games room. The neighbouring community farm, 3 miles, has plenty of amenities including a restaurant, tea room, shop, organic butchery, walking trails, events and children’s activities. Home of the gingerbread, the attractive town of Market Drayton was once famed for its Damson Fairs, and many Draytonarians continue the tradition with damson feasts each autumn. Keen walkers can follow the trails of the famous Clive of India or the unusual bloodthirsty ‘Murder and Mayhem’ track, whilst a wild animal trail offers a rather more sedate option for the children! Market Drayton is the ideal base for touring Stoke and the Potteries, Ironbridge, Shrewsbury and North Wales. The Shropshire union canal winds it way close to the town, its tow paths, flights of locks and breathtaking aqueduct well worth a visit. Nearby you can find award-winning gardens, such as Hodnet, Wollerton Old Hall and Hawkstone Park, with its golf course and unique landscape of caves, woodland and follies. Horse riding and golf nearby. Shops and pubs 2 miles.
Open Fire / Woodburner #Barbecue #Car Parking Available #DVD player #Dishwasher #Fuel and Power Included #Garden / Patio #Golf nearby #Games Room #Highchair #Internet Broadband #Loch / Lake Side #Open Fire #Horse Riding nearby #Rural #Satellite TV #Television #Internet Connection #Linen #Short Break Season #Cot Available #Car Parking Available #Car Parking (Location) #Linen Available #Linen options #Washing Machine #Fishing nearby #Fishing type #Pet Acceptance #Discount - February half-term #Discount - March pre-Easter #Discount - Easter #Discount - April #Historical/heritage property #Home Brand #UKONLY #Parking-designated on site #^
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