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 Wales > Walks in Wales  >   Walking from Pont y Pant to Wybrnant Valley

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 the hairy legged hiker walking in WalesWhere is it ? The walk starts at Pont-y-Pant Station In the beautiful Lledr Valley, close to Dolwyddelan, near Betws y Coed, Snowdonia North Wales.
How long will it take ? 5 miles. The walk took me and Eifion 6 hours to complete. But we did take a few wrong turns and did a lot of dawdling along the way.
What's the attraction ? Includes forest tracks, pastureland in the beautiful Wybrnant valley, riverside walk, the historic Welsh house known as Ty Mawr, views of Snowdonia, tumbling streams and pools.
Rating : Moderate. But best walked after a dry spell as the first section, the forest section, can be very boggy.
Essentials : Walking boots and appropriate wet weather clothes required, expect to sink up to your ankles on the boggy ground at the top of the climb. OS map and compass.


Directions :    [ Map of Pont y Pant to Wybrnant Valley Walk location ]                                                      Map opens in a new window

If travelling by train on the Conwy Valley Railway (recommended) leave the train at Pont y Pant station, exit the station turn right and walk along the lane toward Dolmurgoch cottage.
If travelling by car there is little space to park near Pont-y-Pant and you may have to park in Dolwyddelan. Take the A470 from Betws-y-Coed to Dolwyddelan. Turn left at the Gwydir Pub and continue to the Dolwyddelan  Railway Station car park at Pentre Bont. Exit the car park and bear right follow the lane for 1 mile to metal gate close to Dolmurgoch cottage. Ladder style is on the right.
Facilities : None at Pont-y-Pant Station, but refreshments are available at Plas Hall close to the end of the walk, and in the village of Dolwyddelan there is a Spar shop, public toilets, and the Gwydyr Pub with meals.

Lets Go !

View of Moel SiabodOn exiting Pont-y-Pant Station turn right and follow the lane for .5km  (.3 mile) to Dol mur Goch, a cottage on the right of the lane. Take the ladder style on the left side of the road and climb the track through the field to the forestry track at the top of the field. (Tip. To avoid the muddy patch in the middle of the field scramble over the remains of a stone wall among the trees). Bear left along the forestry track, the road bends to the left, then right, then left again before passing a farmstead on your right hand side. Continue forward along the track, passing through a metal gate. Find a waymarker Immediately on your right. Follow the waymarker taking the narrow track at the edge of the forestry plantation. Walk alongside the stone wall that forms a boundary between the forest and the farmstead. The view opens up with chickens and cows in the foreground and the hills of Snowdonia in the distance.

Continue along the trail heading back into the trees. You will see plenty of evidence of foxes along the trail, those chickens being too much of a temptation for old Reynard.

After a short climb the trail opens out with a pretty display of bluebells in the springtime. But be careful here as the waymarkers can be deceiving. One arrow beckons you to continue on, bearing to the left, while another bears to the right. Ignore the leftward instruction unless you want to visit the "falling over fields". We went left and spent half an hour falling over and still couldn't find the trail. It was a laugh though!
We retraced our steps and took the other trail bearing right and we were soon on our way again.
The trail continues uphill and through the forest with clearings every now and then offering delightful Hazel trees form an archway on the road to Ty Mawrviews of the Carneddau range of mountains to the north.
On reaching the highest point of the walk the landscape again opens out with views of Moel Siabod across the Lledr Valley, Mount Snowdon in the far distance, Tryfan can just be seen to the right of Siabod, and the hill of Y Ro Wen away to the west. It is possible to take the trail to the summit of Y Ro Wen and the village of Dolwyddelan from here but that's for another day.

Our aim is to reach the Wybrnant Valley which according to the map means cutting across the open land and then bearing to the left to a style that crosses the boundary fence between the open land and the forestry plantation. However this route (as of 2008) is blocked by rows of fallen trees, which necessitates Plan B.

Plan B is to bear to the right, west, for a few hundred yards until joining the Dolwyddelan track. On joining this track follow it back heading left toward another boundary fence and cross the ladder style.

From here the ground improves considerably and it's all downhill to Wybrnant. This is the best part of the walk with the verdant pastureland of Wybrnant coming into view. We leave behind the plantation pine trees and welcome the broad leaf trees of the lower hillsides. The forest track becomes a winding lane flanked on both sides by ancient stone walls and hazel coppice leading down to Ty Mawr.

Ty Mawr hold's an important place in the heart of the Welsh nation, being the birthplace of Bishop William Ty MawrMorgan who translated the Bible into the Welsh language. The house has been restored to its 16th–17th-century appearance and houses a display of Welsh bibles.
There is a small fee to enter Ty Mawr but there is no charge to picnic on the old stone bridge and enjoy the peace and quiet of the Wybrnant Valley.

To continue the walk retrace your steps a few yards and take the road north alongside the river through the valley. Depending on the season you may see brown trout in the streams, bluebells in the woods, brilliant white hawthorn, and river boulders carpeted in emerald green moss amid tumbling waterfalls.

As the season warms (we should be so lucky) Wales' woolly quadrupeds are assisted in removing their overcoats by hairy Welsh bipeds. Yes you may see the Welsh farmers shearing their sheep in the peaceful Wybrnant valley.

And should you pause awhile where the river starts to tumble down the hillside to the Lledr you may be fortunate to glimpse even stranger looking beings ....the Tylwyth Teg, the ellyllon, goblins or fairies playing in the enchanted grove that sits close to the lane.

If you can break the spell of Wybrnant then continue on your way down the steep hill into the Lledr Valley. Half way down the hill is the old school at Cyfyng. In bygone days the children came from far and wide to attend the school, but it makes you wonder from where they came as it is the only building to be seen for  miles around. The children crossed the hills and the valleys and through the forest trails to attend this little school on the hill. And fortunately for us one of the old forest trails is still visible next to the school house.

Leave the road and take the trail heading west through the forest until it once again joins the larger forestry track that leads back to Pont-y-Pant. Here you have the option to bear left and take the high road back to the station, or look carefully and you will find another track leading down through the woodlands. Take this track for the scenic riverside route home. The trail passes through a camping site, follow the waymarker to the riverside walk. The track cuts through a tunnel below the Conwy Valley Railway Line and then keeps close to the river for much of the way back.

After heavy rain this section can become particularly boggy but fortunately there is an alternative track set just back from the river.

Both tracks converge below the dramatic Pont-y-Pant Falls. But unfortunately the right of way takes us away from the falls and past both the Lledr Hall and Plas Hall before joining the lane to Pont-y-Pant Station.

Please -- click on the pictures -- for enlarged pictures of the Wybrnant Valley Walk.

Dolmurgoch cottage close to the start of the walk A view of Moel Siabod with Mount Snowdonin the distance
Dolmurgoch, a cottage close to the start of the walk
 
A view of Moel Siabod with Mount Snowdon in the distance
The Carneddau range of mountains   Moel Siabod as seen from the highest point  of the walk
The Carneddau range of mountains come into view
 
Moel Siabod as seen from the highest point of the walk
Take the wrong path and you may end up in the falling down fields
Take the wrong path and you may end up in the falling down fields
Take the wrong path and you may end up in the falling down fields  
Eifion falling down again .
Beautiful moss sporophytes on the upper reaches of the walk Waymarker for Ty Mawr
Beautiful moss sporophytes on the upper reaches of the walk
 
Waymarker for Ty Mawr
The path is flanked with bluebells and ancient stone walls   An arch formed by Hazel trees
Into the sunshine, the path is flanked with bluebells and ancient stone walls
 
The hazel trees form an archway over the old path
The verdant Wybrnant Valley Looking north toward the Lledr valley
Into the verdant Wybrnant Valley
 
Bishop Morgan's old house Ty Mawr   A friendly duck in the river at Ty Mawr
Bishop Morgan's old house Ty Mawr and the stone bridge, great spot for a picnic
 
A friendly duck in the river at Ty Mawr
Emerald green moss on the rocks along the river bank Dappled sunlight encourages the growth of the bluebells among the trees
Emerald green moss, bluebells and ferns abound along the river bank in the Wybrnant Valley
 
Dappled sunlight encourages the growth of the bluebells among the trees
A fairy glen at the end of the Valley   The steep hill down to the Lledr Valley
A beautiful fairy glen at the end of the Valley
 
The steep hill down to the Lledr Valley
The path leading through the campsite toward the Afon Lledr Afon Lledr
The path leads through the campsite toward the Afon Lledr
 
The homeward journey alongside the Afon Lledr
Could these be the biggest gateposts in Britain ?   These two giant redwoods form the gateway to a house close to Pont-y-Pant
Could these be the biggest gateposts in Britain ?
 
These two giant redwood trees form the gateway to a house close to Pont-y-Pant Railway Station

© 
All pictures copyright Bernard Wellings

the hairy legged hikerAttractions and facilities near Pont-y-Pant:


Fishing :
Fishing on the Afon (river) Lledr. Fishing licenses available from the Post Office in Dolwyddelan.


Dolwyddelan Church:
St. Gwyddelan's Church in Dolwyddelan is a lovely church dating from circa 1500AD


Capel Garmon Burial Chamber:
A neolithic burial chamber of the 3rd millennium BC. It is located near Betws y Coed high above the Conwy Valley and there are wonderful views of Snowdonia. It is a major archaeological site and it is well worth a visit.


Dolwyddelan Castle:
1 mile
Dolwyddelan, Gwynedd


Conwy Valley Railway:
Running from Blaenau Ffestiniog, in the heart of Snowdonia, to Llandudno, on the north Wales coast, it travels through the beautiful Lledr Valley and the Conwy Valley.


Directions :

By Train:

The Conwy Valley Railway Line is well worth a trip in itself. Catch the train anywhere from Llandudno to Blaenau Ffestiniog. Disembark the train at Pont-y-Pant Station. Remember to check the timetables for the return journey as the trains are infrequent. Also please note that you have to stick out your hand to stop the train,

By Car:

From Betws y Coed travel south on the A5 for 200 yds, turn first right onto the A470. Follow the road through the delightful Lledr Valley to Dolwyddelan (approx. 4 miles). Turn left in the centre of the village, opposite the Gwydir Pub, follow the road for some 300 yds, and turn first left again at the school, the Car Park is at Dolwyddelan Station.


return to tourist attractions Map of WalesThe Hidden Valley Walk > , Pont-y-Pant to Dolwyddelan Castle Walk >
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