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 Wales > Walks in Wales  >   A walk from New Quay to Aberaeron on the Ceredigion coastal path, Cardigan Bay, West Wales

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the hairy legged hiker walking in WalesWhere is it?  The walk starts In the town of New Quay, "Cei Newydd", on Cardigan Bay, Ceredigion. It finishes in Aberaeron and is part of the newly opened Ceredigion Coastal Path
How long will it take ? :  Approximately 3 hr. Approximately 6.8 miles, 10 km
What's the attraction? : Beautiful unspoilt views of Cardigan Bay,  and with luck you may spot the dolphins in the Bay. (the best place to see the dolphins is the harbour at New Quay)
Essentials : Wear stout footwear and be prepared for bad weather, believe it or not it can rain in Wales! The walk is quite straight forward, just follow the waymarkers. Carry an OS map and compass. Please note that the return bus to New Quay may have the Welsh name of Cei Newydd displayed. And the bus to Cardigan may have the Welsh name of Aberteifi displayed
Rating : Moderate. There are a few short climbs but the path mostly sticks to the lower slopes of the hillsides
Car Parking : Park the car in the central car park above the harbour in New Quay. Charges 2.00 per 8hrs as of 2008
Facilities : Refreshments available in Aberaeron. Toilets close to the harbour in Aberaeron


Directions :   [ Map of New Quay to Aberaeron Walk location ]
New Quay is in Ceredigion West Wales. Take the A487 Aberystwyth to Cardigan road. At the Synod Inn road junction take the A486 to New Quay. It's a small town with narrow streets and a one way system with a 20 m.p.h. speed limit.
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Lets Go !

New QuayWe start the walk at the harbour in New Quay.  From the harbour walk up Glanmor Terrace, the road that runs uphill and paralell with the beach. On your right are souvenir shops and pubs / restaurants, while on your left are grand views of the beach and harbour. Looking further to the east you will have a good view of the Ceredigion coastline toward Aberaeron, our destination.

As you walk up Glanmore Terrace you might find it interesting to know that various pubs and buildings are associated with the great Welsh poet Dylan Thomas. The Hungry Trout restaurant, formerly New Quay Post Office, was believed to be the inspiration for the post office in Under Milk Wood, while the Blue Bell, Seahorse, and Black Lion pubs were all frequented by the great Welsh boozer.

At the top of Glanmor Terrace bear left along the B4342 as far as Brongwyn Lane. Follow the leafy lane and take the steps down to the beach. Bear right along the beautiful sandy beach as far as Llanina Point. Leave the beach at Llanina Point taking the footpath for a few hundred yards as far as a tarmac road. Bear left along the road, over the hump backed bridge. To the right, in the woodlands, are the ruins of an old water mill. Continue along the road and bear left at the first junction and right at the T junction. A short distance along the lane take the first left and then left and right as the path weaves between some buildings.

IAberaeron harbour, our destinationgnore the track to your left (this leads to Cei Bach campsite) and follow the coastal path waymarker into the open field.

The coastal path proper begins at this point. To your right is a fine looking hill, and to your left beyond the trees is Little Quay Bay, or Cei Bach. The path crosses an open field before starting to ascend, passing through some pleasant woodland before becoming the more typical single track through the bracken and open grassland.

There are panoramic views of Cardigan Bay, looking south back to New Quay Bay or north to Aberaeron and Aberystwyth. Keep your eyes open for the small fishing boats with fishermen checking their lobster pots, although spider crabs seem to be the most common crustacean in Cardigan Bay at the moment.

The rest of the route is easy to follow, it's just a case of following the waymarkers. Although after saying that there are a few sections that might prove to be disconcerting to some.

The first is at the waterfall that tumbles over the rock on it's way to Cardiff Bay, close to the 3 mile, 5km, mark. After crossing the bridge bear right but keep your eyes open for a waymarker after a hundred yards or so. Follow the pointer for the coastal path that directs you sharp left up the bank.

The second tricky section is another 0.6 mile, or 1km further along the track at Gilfach Holiday Village. Here the track descends into a small valley but on first sight it appears to go through private property. Just as a few roof tops of the village come into view a gate bars the path. But to the right of the gate is a stone stile, so that's OK. But continue down the lane to the next gate. This definitely seems to be a problem as it forms part of a holding pen for a pair of horses. But fear not it is part of the coastal path and the horses were friendly enough. Follow the lane past the village complex and on reaching a road junction bear left following the winding road over a bridge and on up the hill for a few hundred yards. At the top of the hill are waymarkers, follow the directions of the waymarkers to the left for the coastal path. Enter the field and bear right cutting diagonally across the field. Well that's what  we did! But on reflection the correct route might be to follow the hedgerow toward the seaward end of the field and then to bear right again following the hedgerow to the far corner. Whichever way you traverse the field the outcome is the same, as the coastal path leads off from the far corner of the field diagonally opposite where the path enters the field. Phew!

On reaching Aberaeron there is a pleasant walk around the harbour and over the wooden bridge with plenty of colourful Georgian properties to admire. Being a harbour village / town it is no surprise that Aberaeron has a selection of seafood restaurants and fishmongers including the Harbour Restaurant and the Hive on the Quay. Aberaeron also has more than it's fair share of pubs for such a small town, which may explain why this was another favourite haunt of Dylan Thomas.

To return to New Quay walk up Market Street to the High Street, the A486. There is a regular bus service from the High Street bus stop (If my memory serves me well the 550 Service bus runs at 20 minutes past the hour, weekdays) But contact Travelline Wales.com to be sure.

Please -- click on the pictures -- for enlarged pictures of the walk from New Quay to Aberaeron, West Wales, UK.

© All pictures copyright Bernard Wellings

New Quay harbour and beach The Black Lion public house, a favourite of Dylan Thomas the Welsh poet
We start the walk near New Quay harbour and beach
 
We pass the Black Lion public house, a favourite of Dylan Thomas the Welsh poet
Glorious sands of Traethgwyn Beach lead to Llanina Point   Beautiful pastoral views near Cei Bach
The glorious sands of Traethgwyn Beach lead to Llanina Point
 
Beautiful pastoral views near Cei Bach
The path leads through a section of woodland Before reaching more typical bracken and open grass lands
The path leads through a section of woodland
 
Before reaching more typical bracken and open grass lands
Looking back toward Cei Newydd, New Quay   Looking north toward Aberaeron
Looking back toward Cei Newydd, New Quay
 
Looking north toward Aberaeron
A waterfall cuts through the hard rocks Another small valley or gully along the way
A waterfall cuts through the hard rocks on its journey to Cardigan Bay
 
Another small valley or gully along the way
Colourful flowers along the cliff edges   Flowers including stonecrop and lousewort
Colourful flowers along the cliff edges
 
Flowers including stonecrop and lousewort
Coastal path waymarker Watch the fishermen checking their Lobster pots
Always follow the coastal path waymarker
 
Fishermen can be seen checking their Lobster pots
The single track turns into a country lane   Cuts through a horse pen
The single track becomes a country lane
 
Before cutting through a horse's pen
The path continues toward Aberaeron Aberaeron comes into view
The path continues toward Aberaeron, but it keeps to the lower slopes of the hillside
 
Aberaeron comes into view
Aberaeron harbour   And finally Aberaeron High Street and the bus station to New Quay
The walk takes us past the boats in picturesque Aberaeron harbour
 
And finally Aberaeron High Street and the bus station to New Quay. Please note that the bus to New Quay will have the Welsh name of Cei Newydd displayed!

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